Gladiator GNR Ivatt Tender – Sussed it at last.

Well, after all the discussion and mental hand wringing by yours truly I do believe that I have cracked it.

I soldered some scrap etch into each side of the front step of the tender and sods law dictates now that I have I will find suitable parts included (I confess that I didn’t even check).

Gladiator Ivatt Tender -Coal Chute

Gladiator Ivatt Tender -Coal Chute

Gladiator Ivatt Tender -Coal Chute

It’s all dry fitted at this point and before soldering I do need to check that the tank vents will fit – I may have to straighten the curve a bit to create a flat ledge for the vents to sit on but if I do I will report back.

Gladiator Ivatt Tender -Coal Chute

Gladiator Ivatt Tender -Coal Chute

A very informative circle

Having essentially gone around in a circle I have received a lot of information and help from a couple of gents via RMweb and the LNER Forum – Dave Lester and Paul Craig.
With Paul’s help I had determined that my tender was indeed a self trimming variety and Dave confirmed it by posting exactly the type of tender that was attached to my loco 64206 from 1935 -1960 (tender 614) and with further help from Paul I believe that I have worked out how it fits together too.
This has proven a very interesting side trip into the world of tenders from which I have learned a lot. I must also offer an apology to the late Malcolm Crawley for remotely suggesting that he might have had it wrong….
More progress to come as it happens

A Few Tender Questions, and Maybe an Answer or Two

The plot thickens. It seems that there are two externally visibly the same tenders which may well be the 3000 gallon version and the 3500 gallon versions.
By extreme good fortune this year I have taken photos of both. I had forgotten the other until today though.
The first one is located at Shildon, attached to the C1 large-boilered Atlantic and, as proposed in a recent post, I asked one of the museum assistants if I could be accompanied aboard to take photos of the tender top on Saturday and he obliged.
The other is attached by coincidence to the small-boilered Atlantic Henry Oakley whom I encountered at York earlier in the year. Although not great and I didn’t get aboard, I did get enough details from my photos to work out which version I need for the J6 and more importantly that the coal space on the kit isn’t quite like the two preserved examples each of which are similar but different.
Firstly what the kit looks like:
Next the tender attached to the Large Atlantic
I have more detailed photos of the tender top on my Flickr site but these will suffice to tell the story to date.
Lastly the tender attached to Henry Oakley and the one which I believe that I need for the J6 when compared to the couple of photos I have of the prototype – no 64206 and more importantly the type that I believe the kit is meant to represent (unless there was a third type which looked externally the same.
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As I said, not the best photos but they do show that one side is higher than the other and there is a representation of lockers albeit the prototype show a small door on the higher side whereas the etch has a full height door. The key difference though is in the coal space. Both types of tender have a parallel rather plain functional coal space and I would be surprised if there was a third type that had one with the sloping sides that are inferred by the etches. I think that Malcolm Crawley got it wrong when he designed the tender kit but I would be happy to be corrected in that assumption.
Unless some evidence comes to the fore fairly soon to tell me that I am wrong I intend to modify the coal space to be more like that of the tender attached to Henry Oakely.

Guildex Part Two – My Loco Section Model Entry

Around 4 weeks or so ago I decided to enter my tram engine into the modelling competition in the Loco section.   Having done so, a week before the show I decided to weather it.

Weathered Connoisseur Models Tram Engine

Weathered Connoisseur Models Tram Engine

Weathered Connoisseur Models Tram Engine

Weathered Connoisseur Models Tram Engine

Weathered Connoisseur Models Tram Engine

Although it didn’t do anything in the competition I am really pleased with how it came out and I don’t regret the decision to weather it.

Guildex 2018 The O Gauge Premier Show

Last weekend I was demonstrating my Silhouette Cutter at Guildex for a couple of days. I also, as has been my habit for the last few years, entered a few items in the Modelling Competition. I had three entries in the rolling stock section and to my surprise and delight two of them took 2nd and 3rd places – First was quite rightly won by a full breakdown train.

Moving Coal entry in the Guildex 2018 Rolling Stock section of the Modelling Competition;

Rather foolishly on the day I clipped the opening end door shut on the NBR wagon so it’s best feature was lost on the judges. As it turned out if it had done something it would have only displaced one of the other entries so nothing lost.

Parkside NBR Jubilee Open Wagon.

Parkside NBR Jubilee Open Wagon.

Parkside NBR Jubilee Open Wagon.

Parkside NBR Jubilee Open Wagon.

Guildex 2018 Highly Commended in the Rolling Stock section of the Modelling Competition

The Highly Commended entry is now in the small adds because being in BR livery it doesn’t really fit with my grouping era models.

Guildex Silhouette Cutter Demo preview.

Whether you are planning a visit to Guildex or not here is a preview of what’s on view on my Silhouette Cutter Demo on Stand D10

All of them either made completely from or kits enhanced by additional parts cut on the Silhouette

Slaters NER 20 Ton Hopper Wagon with Silhouette Cut internal details

Slaters NER 20 Ton Hopper Wagon with Silhouette Cut internal details

Slaters NER 20 Ton Hopper Wagon with Silhouette Cut internal details

Slihouette Cut NER Implement Wagon

Slaters NER 20 Ton Hopper Wagon with Silhouette Cut internal details

Silhouette Cut GER Open Carriage Truck

Silhouette Cut GER Open Carriage Truck

Silhouette Cut GER Open Carriage Truck

A tender spot in the instructions – Gladiator J6 with Self Trimming Tender

Well I have to admit I have reached a bit of the kit instructions that have really stumped me…

“Take coal space sides, note the handling and drill 1.85mm at half etched pops if fitting scoop and tank vents, then fold so that the sides fit into the coal space front plate, tack into position taking care to be square to front plate. Sit the assembly into it’s slot in the sole plate and tack onto position square ‘each way'”

I found the parts easily enough and put them together how I interpreted the instructions but then found that there was nowhere/way that they would fit.

Gladiator J6 Coal Chute

Gladiator J6 Coal Chute

Gladiator J6 Coal Chute

Gladiator J6 Coal Chute

There is a plan and top down outline drawing supplied but I can’t figure out from which bit is the coal space front plate or which orientation it fits in.

My only saving grace is that there is one of these tenders attached to the C1 Atlantic at Locomotion so I plan to see if I can get aboard it when I am there next weekend to see how the coal chute/plate is made up on the real thing.

I am on my way to Telford tomorrow so I will have better things to think about until mid next week.

Gladiator GNR Self Trimming Tender

Further work on the tender last night got one of the more difficult bits behind me – bending the one-piece tank sides/end.

However, I will start off with a bit of a gotcha! The instructions tell you if modelling post 1940 to drill out two etched dimples on the rear right hand side of the tender for hand rails that must have been fitted to some tenders at some point.

Having done it I immediately started to think I wonder. Sure, enough when I looked at photos of 64206 which is the loco being modelled I noted no rear handrail….

So, I opened out the holes to 1.55mm and soldered some stubs of rod in – this is it from the inside

Gladiator GNR Self Trimming Tender – fixing a mistake

And from the outside – thankfully nothing shows

Gladiator GNR Self Trimming Tender – fixing a mistake

Next the tender sides are rectangular but on the real thing on the tender that I am working on there are cut outs for a handrail as in this example by Ron Bowyer.

[url=https://flic.kr/p/okJtkh][img]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5561/14663148970_50f779a2c3_k.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/okJtkh]GNR/LNER Gresley "J6" class 0-6-0 No. 64223.[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/93456400@N04/]Ron Bowyer[/url], on Flickr

I have to confess to struggling with the instructions on this point so I went my own way. There are sections of etched beading to represent this and having worked out for myself how I believe they are meant to fit I tacked them to each end

Gladiator GNR Self Trimming Tender – cutting out for the hand rail

Gladiator GNR Self Trimming Tender – cutting out for the hand rail

This allowed me to scribe a line to cut/file to and then I unsoldered them and removed the bits that needed removing. Time will tell as to whether what I have done is correct but studying various photos it looks right.

The next job was to drill out one of two dimples for the front handrail knob – these are design for a short rail where the top is cut out as I have done or a long rail where the side is left at full height. I drilled out the lower ones.

Then I carefully marked out where the first bend should be and then bent it using my Metalsmith Drilling table with a rod slightly smaller than the required bend clamped to it.

Modified by CombineZP

Modified by CombineZP

 

If this sort of thing scares you take heart. I didn’t get it right first time, I just calmly straightened it with fingers and thumbs finally using smooth bladed pliers to finish off and them remeasured and tried again. The first side (the one in the photos) I got right on the second attempt. The other side took three goes…. but I got there.

Next up is to solder in the bulkhead.

Where the instructions are really lacking is that they refer to parts but don’t number them so you are constantly searching the scans of the etches and the index to find out which part you are looking for – the scans are labelled with part numbers and there is an index but it would be so much better if the instructions had part numbers alongside the text.

Gladiator GNR Self Trimming Tender

Then lastly solder the side/end piece to the footplate.

Gladiator GNR Self Trimming Tender

Gladiator GNR Self Trimming Tender

A tender moment or two with the Gladiator J6

After my interlude with the Streamlined Coronations I am now back on the J6.
Over the last couple of evenings I have prepared the Finney Hornguides/blocks ([s]nicked[/s]) borrowed from my A1 kit until I collect some more from the guys at Telford.
Then I started on the instructions which have you prepare the outer chassis first and then attach it to the tender footplate.
Here’s where I got to on that last night.

Gladiator GNR Self Trimming Tender Chassis

Gladiator GNR Self Trimming Tender Chassis

Southern Pillbox Brake Van finished and sold

Last night saw the Southern Brake Van finished. Anyone who hasn’t used Glue N Glaze before I can thoroughly recommend it.

I added it to small adds and it sold fairly quickly.

Parkside SR-BR Pillbox Brake Van

Parkside SR-BR Pillbox Brake Van

Parkside SR-BR Pillbox Brake Van

Parkside SR-BR Pillbox Brake Van

Parkside SR-BR Pillbox Brake Van

Parkside SR-BR Pillbox Brake Van

Parkside SR-BR Pillbox Brake Van

A touch of the Southern rolling across the bench

During last week I took a little time out on a couple of evenings to get the top coat of paint on ready for transfers.

 

A more knowledgeable gent than I also pointed out that I had made an error with one of the brake linkages so I will have a look at sorting that.

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van

 

I then blackened the buffers and added a decent set of 3 link couplings.

 

To blacken the buffer shanks I heated then to cherry red with the microflame and dunked them in a small pot of oil (I used 3 in 1 but apparently any oil even cooking oil will do the job). When cool take them out and wrap in kitchen paper to soak up all the oil and leave until the next day when they are ready for fitting – Please note this method is only any good for steel buffer heads

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van

 

Parkside Southern Brake Van

I had a really busy weekend this weekend and one the things that I made much progress on was the SR Brake van that I started earlier in the thread.
After work today I gave it blast of primer and here it is.

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van – In Primer

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van – In Primer

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van – In Primer

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van – In Primer

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van – In Primer

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van – In Primer

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van – In Primer

Parkside SR Pillbox Brake Van – In Primer

Now I have a bit of a dilemma, I plan to sell it once it’s finished (I bought it specifically to build and sell on as I neither model BR or the Southern) and I have seen examples with both screw and 3 link coupling and I am unsure which to add – If I add screw couplings it will add another £5 to the price.
Similarly with a stove, if I add a cast stove it will again add another £5 to the cost. without my adding anything for the assembly etc. of them.
If you were a buyer would you prefer screw couplings and a stove or to get the van £10 cheaper?

Duckets and Dynamos, slow progress on the Kirk Twins

Although modelling time has been limited recently I have made a little more progress with the twins.
I was a bit remiss in not cutting out for the ducket while I had the sides in the flat but I managed.
We now have one of my silhouette cut duckets fitted. This in fact the second attempt because I was a bit heavy handed with polystyrene cement last weekend and the first effort just melted away – this one is stuck more patiently with limonene.

Silhouette Cut Ducket – On Kirk 7mm brake 3rd

I had also prepped some scrap etch for the mounting brackets for the dynamos last weekend and I got those fitted too although from the photo one of them need a minor tweak to it’s shape.

Dynamo Mounting brackets fitted to modified Kirk Dynamos

DJH Streamlined Coronation – From Woe to Recovery

From “Woe to Recovery”, it sounds like the title of a book or film
Where do I start, when assembling the cylinders, one of the jobs was to drill out the valve guides. When I drilled the first one I managed to break a drill bit of in the middle of it. I attempted to get it out by cutting off the rear spigot and drilling small holes around the end of the drill bit but didn’t succeed in getting it out. I popped a bit of rod in the other end and it went a fair way in so I reasoned that I might get away with shortening the rod because the valve stems don’t appear to move that much.
This was what was peeking out of the end of the casting but it wasn’t quite enough to grip.

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Motion – Getting out of trouble with a broken drill bit in a whitemetal casting

When I broke the drill bit off in the first casting, I decided to make a collet to allow me to better grip the second casting without damage and I was able to drill the second one without issue.
This is the collet and another view of my attempts to remove the offending drill bit stub

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Motion – Getting out of trouble with a broken drill bit in a whitemetal casting

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Motion – Getting out of trouble with a broken drill bit in a whitemetal casting
I advised the gent that I am building it for what had happened and that we may need a spare casting but I was going to attempt to work my way past it. During the assembly of the valve gear I carefully measured the amount of valve stem and progressively shortened it until it fit.
Fast forward to giving it a test run and it dropped out of the guide jamming up the valve gear.

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Motion – Getting out of trouble

When this happened on Tuesday evening I took the wise course and stopped to ponder.
First thing yesterday morning as I was getting up for work, Chris said I have the solution to getting the drill bit out and proceeded to explain the idea that she had dreamt while asleep. The idea was basically, to cut a cut down the side of the casting to relieve the grip from the whitemetal and then drift the stub out.
After dinner I went into the workshop to take the valve gear to bits and unsolder the valve guide casting. I then out the casting in the collet and after a bit of a fiddle managed to get the seam of the casting lined up with the slit in the collet and gripped in the vice.

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Motion – Getting out of trouble with a broken drill bit in a whitemetal casting

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Motion – Getting out of trouble, making the cut

That done and using an old Exacto Blade, I proceeded to cut through the side of the casting using some odour free white spirit as a lubricant (made more essential by the fact that this Exacto blade has a slight kink at one end). I kept steadily cutting until I felt the blade grating on the side of the drill bit stub (why I used an old blade) and then removed the casting from the vice.

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Motion – Getting out of trouble, making the cut

The next bit’s I forgot to take photos of but using another broken drill bit as a drift I placed the bottom end of the casting on a block of wood which I have on my bench with the protruding stub of the drill over a hole that I had drilled when going through something previously (it doesn’t quite look like swiss cheese but there are a good few holes in it).
The drift moved the drill bit out a few millimetres further, to the point where I was able to grip it in a pin vice. I was then able to grip the casting in my hand and a twist of the pin vice had it free.

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Motion – Getting out of trouble, success at last

I then filled the seam with 70 degree solder and using the collet as a heat sink I soldered the casting back on and cleaned it up. In the photo below the seam is uppermost and is to all intents and purposes invisible.

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Motion – Getting out of trouble, casting repaired

Lastly I dismantled and remade the valve stem. The original is two layers of etch. I made the replacement from a piece of 1.10mm brass rod. I am not too happy with the boss so I plan to have another go later this morning.
This is the shortened version.

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Motion – Getting out of trouble, shortened valve stem

This is with the bit that I had cut off

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Motion – Getting out of trouble, shortened valve stem

Lastly this is the replacement.

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Motion – Getting out of trouble, replacement valve stem

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Assembly of the motion

Despite many distractions recently I have made slow progress on the Coronation.
One of the easier wins over the weekend was to epoxy the balance weights on – the instructions have you do this much earlier in the build but I seem to have a tendency to do them as late as possible and I am not sure why.

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Balance weights fitted

Then on to the fun bits, I wanted to make the valve gear removable for painting so some mods were needed
This is what the front of the frames looked like with slots where the cylinders fed through to attach to the top of the frame spacer.

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Loco Chassis Brakes and minor details fitted

This was what they look like after a visit from my piercing saw.

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Cut outs to make motion removable

Then I needed to make some spacers to attach the two cylinders together

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Spacers to make cylinders removable

Doing this meant that the 2mm diameter screws provided were not long enough so I retapped the holes 8BA and added some longer 8 ba screws. to hold them on.
next I soldered the slide bars to the motion bracket frame and started to assemble the valve gear

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Assembled motion

DJH provide 14ba screws/nut to assemble the valve gear which I have used but I have also done a belt and braces approach by tapping all the holes 14ba too which allows the nut to be locked on. Most of them also needed to be filed back for clearance purposes.

DJH Streamlined Coronation – Assembled motion

Last night I fitted the motor into the basic chassis and ran it for a while with the connecting rods attached. It was a good sign that nothing decided to unscrew itself while it ran (which can be a sign of something amiss).
Hopefully tonight will see the valve gear fitted and tested before stripping it back down ready for Warren to paint.