DJH Streamlined Coronation – on with the Chassis

So it’s onto the loco chassis,
I made a start on Saturday afternoon and up to last night I had made it to

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Basic Loco Chassis

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Basic Loco Chassis

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Loco Chassis Brakes and minor details fitted

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Loco Chassis Brakes and minor details fitted

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Loco Chassis Brakes and minor details fitted

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Loco Chassis Brakes and minor details fitted

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Loco Chassis Brakes and minor details fitted

Which brought me to the end of drawing number 2 of the chassis instructions.
I made one minor error in that I got one of the chassis spacers/supports the wrong way up which meant that the hole for the brake cylinder was in the wrong place. Rather than take the chassis apart again I just redrilled the hole at the other end of the spacer and filed the tabs of a couple of brackets that should have fit into some slots. Job done and brakes fitted as they should be.

DJH Streamlined Coronation – It’s getting busy back there

Once the rear bulkhead was soldered in, next up I concentrated on getting the many details on the rear of the tender added.

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Side farings and rear bulkhead attached

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Side farings and rear bulkhead attached

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Side farings and rear bulkhead attached

It’s quite busy back there…

More DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender Moments

Where had we got to?
Once I had the sides to the right shape and soldered to the bunker rear I set about detailing the front and rear bulkheads. As I mentioned in York Paul’s thread I fitted all the whitemetal castings to the rear bulkhead prior to fitting it. Those on the front bulkhead await fitting.
in true perverse DJH fashion, although the front bulk head and many of it’s constituent parts are half etched the rear bulkhead is full thickness.
Front Bulkhead

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Bulk heads and other sub assemblies

Rear Bulkhead

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Bulk heads and other sub assemblies

Streamlined Cover and Ladder for the rear of the Tender.

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Bulk heads and other sub assemblies

Dealing with the thickness of the metal has been a real learning curve on this one because my 80 Watt Ersa solder station won’t touch it with 145 degree solder at my usual 340 degree setting.
I have had to whack it up to 400 to get the solder to run. This has meant that much of the soldering has been done with the microflame including (and this may want some of you to lay in a darkened room…:facepalm:) the whitemetal bits.

Sorting out Tender frustrations – DJH Streamlined Coronation

Following on from my earlier post , the tender sides are battleship plate thickness. They come pre bent to shape to follow the bulkheads – what a shame the bends were too low

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Reforming the flare

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Reforming the flare

I used my my cheap cooks torch bought from Lidl just before christmas. I have found it’s too hot and uncontrollable for soldering but it’s great for annealing.

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Reforming the flare

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender – Reforming the flare

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender

However, before you get to the tender sides in the instructions, the next section has you making up the coal chute and coal pusher which went together perfectly.
Finally I popped along to the NRM at York and was able to get on board Duchess of Hamilton and take a comparison photo

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender

How I do return Cranks

For this build the front and rear drivers have the standard 12ba crank pin as provided by Slaters with their wheels. The centre axle has had the 12ba cheese head screw replaced with a 10ba countersunk screw. This is to allow the crank pin bush to be tapped 10ba and an additional bush to be added and again tapped 10ba so that they can be screwed in opposite each other to house both the couple and connecting rods (on this particular kit the extra bush was available because a pair of smaller bushes had been provided for the front axle to ensure clearance for the crossheads).
As well as tapping the crank pin bushes 10ba, I also tap the wheel itself allowing the screw to be tightened and retained.
I must admit for my own builds I tend to replace all my crank pins with 10ba and blacken the wheels but I was told not to for this build.

Use of 10ba crank pins for return cranks

You can see the difference in screw sizes from the back of the wheel.

Use of 10ba crank pins for return cranks

I also drilled and tapped the return crank itself but it will be soldered to the bush once I have cut it to the correct length and made sure that the crank is in the right orientation.

Use of 10ba crank pins for return cranks

Use of 10ba crank pins for return cranks

Making the most of what you have…

My recent lathe purchase has started me thinking about making the most of some of my other tools. I used to do quite a bit of woodworking until we converted our garage and I no longer had the room for many of the woodworking tools so I sold them.
What I kept were, chop saw, Router/router table and a linisher. The Router/router table, until a couple of weeks ago was in my loft so not accessible for regular use and my linisher while slightly more accessible by being under my workbench had only seen the light of day once in the last 5 years.
Prompted by getting something out of the loft I decided to get the Router/router table and the linisher out and take them to the other house where I have a dry brick built garage that’s alarmed. Fast forward to this weekend and I decided to start making use of them so used the linisher to prepare all the partitions for the twin set. Each one needed to be profiles to fit the vacuum formed Kirk roof and it certainly made a much easier job of the 17 or so partitions plus the coach ends.

Ian Kirk coach partitions

Preparing Ian Kirk coach partitions using a Linishing machine

I reckon what I achieved today would have taken at least a couple of weekend’s work to achieve filing by hand.

DJH/Tower Models Streamlined Coronation Build

On Easter Sunday afternoon I had a phone call from a gent that puts a lot of work my way asking if I could fit in building a DJH Streamlined Coronation as soon as possible. The Gent that I am building the J6 for is in no rush so I decided to have a bash.
The kit was dult delivered on Sunday evening and by bedtime I had the basic tender chassis together.
Another couple of hours on Monday morning had the tender chassis complete, so far so good.

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender

DJH Streamlined Coronation Tender

To a degree I feel that any criticism that I make of this kit is a bit like sour grapes given that I chose the David Andrews kit over the Tower/DJH version when I bought mine.
That said, hiding what I find doesn’t help anyone else who may decide to build one of these.
The key issue with the tender chassis is that the cross members that fit between the wheels are  a single half etched layer in the middle section, which makes them very vulnerable to bending. This and other areas where key parts are a single half etched layer (more on that later) are particularly noticeable to me when this build comes right on the heels of building the MOK LMS tender which is prototypically similar in many respects.
Although I don’t know the name of the loco that the model is to ultimately represent I have been asked to build it as one of the double chimney red ones – Apparently there were some differences on the red ones over the first few blue ones (I had originally planned to build mine as Duchess of Hamilton in Blue when Coronation was masquerading as DOH while DOH went to America masquerading as Coronation, confused yet…..). Luckily the kit also came with a loan of the Wild Swan/NRM Loco Priles book for the Coronation Pacifics.

Ian Kirk Twin Set Underframe fittings

Although I haven’t posted on this for a while things have progressed but there hasn’t been much to take photos of.
We had decided to try the Sparmac queen posts from Invertrain while all the other fittings (vac tanks, roof vents, grab handles etc.) came from JLRT late last year before they closed although they look similar the key different in the Sparmac queen posts is the fact that they don’t have holes for the truss rods to go through. I popped them with a punch, deepend the mark with a pin vice and then used my Proxxon Pillar drill to finish them off. Sadly taking the photos has just highlighted to me that I have missed drilling through one the holes so I will need to do that one by hand since they are now stuck firmly on.
I also added the vacuum tanks.

Ian Kirk Twin Set – Queen Posts and Vacuum Tanks

Ian Kirk Twin Set – Queen Posts and Vacuum Tanks

Ian Kirk Twin Set – Queen Posts and Vacuum Tanks

Ian Kirk Twin Set – Queen Posts and Vacuum Tanks

Tender Skin…..

This is what it looks like with the overlays on the body. You get two options included in the kit either welded or riveted. I chose riveted because it adds a little more to the character.

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender Top – Outer Skin

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender Top – Outer Skin

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender Top – Outer Skin

These latter two show the front bulkhead now it’s fitted and the fire iron tunnel which fitted perfectly.

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender Top – Outer Skin

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender Top – Fire Iron Tunnel

More tenderness from MOK.

Before going any further I started to make up the bulkheads which are made up from multiple layers. Here the instructions (or my interpretation of them) let me down again and I managed to get the overlay for the top of the front bulkhead out of sequence meaning that I had to cut a section out of it to prevent having to undo a lot of work meaning that it sits around the lockers not behind them (it was quite easy to do with scissors due to it being half etched). It isn’t visible in the end result but I know I had to do it.

Front Bulkhead

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender – Front Bulkhead

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender – Front Bulkhead

Fire Iron Tunnel

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender Top – Fire Iron Tunnel

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender Top – Fire Iron Tunnel

A Tender MOK moment (more like 3 days work actually!)

A few days off over Easter saw me make further progress on the 06.
Shaping the curves of the inner tender sides was interesting because in my ignorance I had chopped off one end of the etch which contained the marked etched bend lines and although I still had the piece that I removed I couldn’t realistically realign it. So some careful measuring was in order.
I annealed the tops of the sides where the main bend was to be – I did this a couple of times during the process.

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender – Bending the Flare

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender – Bending the Flare

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender – Bending the Flare

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender – Bending the Flare

In order to bend the front curves of the tender sides which were very close to the half etched line for the location of the front bulkhead I soldered in a couple of strips of scrap to stop it bending on the half etched line instead of where I wanted it to.

Once happy I soldered in the rear bulkhead and started to add details.

LNER 06 (MOK 8F) Tender Top

Gladiator J6 Modified Loco springs fitted to the frames

Although there hasn’t been much to share, work has been progressing on the J6.
We now have all the springs attached to the frame. Initially I though to have the centre springs removable and the for and aft ones just soldered on but in the end I drilled and tapped them all 12ba so they are all removable should the need arise.

Gladiator J6 Loco Springs Fitted

Gladiator J6 Loco Springs Fitted

Gladiator J6 Loco Springs Fitted

Gladiator J6 Loco Springs Fitted

Gladiator J6 Horn Guides Fitted

Recently I seem to have been spending far too much time browsing and not enough time modelling but I have made some positive progress which I can share.
I have fitted the motions plate with some angle brackets to allow it to be screwed to the frames.

Modified by CombineZP

Not the best photo in the world but hopefully it’s good enough.
Then last night saw the horn guides installed using my Hobby Holidays jig. I also made use of the Use of the springs allowed me to position the horn guides much better without them moving.

Modified by CombineZP

Modified by CombineZP

Because I am using Finney LNER horn guides I now need to file out the bits that protrude into the holes in the frames etc. marked in red on the photo so that’s this evening main task.

Further detail on the Kirk Coach bogies

More done on the bogies over the weekend.
The brakes and yokes are now fitted to all three bogies. not exactly like the real thing but will pass muster hidden away underneath the coach.

Kirk Bogie modifcations – brakes and yokes

Kirk Bogie modifcations – brakes and yokes

Kirk Bogie modifcations – brakes and yokes

If you are wondering why the rod between the two yokes? It’s to hold the brakes away from the tyres to prevent friction.
They just need guard irons over the yokes and they are well on their way.

Parkside NBR Jubilee Mineral Wagon

For those who notice such things, I have managed to correct the brakes being the wrong way around in the photos in my last post.

Plus while working on the Kirk twin art set I have been slowly assembling a Parkside NBR Jubilee Mineral wagon. Not the best mouldings that I have seen from the Parkside stable but I think it will be fine once painted and weathered.

Parkside NBR Jubilee Mineral Wagon

I made the loops that allow the end door to open on the original from 0.6mm styrene rod which I wound around a 0.5mm drill bit in a PIN vice, I then poured boiling water over it and then quenched it in cold water which retained the coil. It was then an easy matter to trim and fit the loops. I used a couple of the off cuts to make the rings for the horse hooks. I would have normally used brass wire for these but I didn’t have any to hand the correct size so I decide to see what I could do with styrene.

Parkside NBR Jubilee Mineral Wagon

Parkside NBR Jubilee Mineral Wagon

The more observant will note that the brake levers are in different positions in the photos. This is done because I find it a real pain masking them off while painting so I decided to make them move.

To achieve this I drilled the back of the lever and glued in a short section of 1.5mm styrene rod. I drilled through the mounting block under the sole bar and then cut a short length of 1.5mm inside diameter styrene tube to fit over the rod once it passed through the mounting block to create a locking washer which retains the lever but allows movement.

Parkside NBR Jubilee Mineral Wagon – Working brake levers

Parkside NBR Jubilee Mineral Wagon

Before it hits the paint shop, I still need to solder the coupling links closed and add the pins and chain to the brake levers.