Cable Drums refined!

In a previous post on wagon loads (Here), I made some cable drums from wooden pieces created by drilling out lightening/cable runs on my layout boards and matchsticks.

Last weekend I came across a few more of the wooden circles and decided to see if I could improve upon them now that I have the NW Shortline Chopper to cut some coffee stirrers instead of the match sticks. An hour later I had 5 cable drums.

A quick resize, a visit to the printer and then some careful cutting out and I had some labels for them.

 

Scratch Built 7m scale Cable Drums

Scratch Built 7m scale Cable Drums

Scratch Built 7m scale Cable Drums

Scratch Built 7m scale Cable Drums

I told you I was easily distracted….

Underneath the Arches….

A couple of years or so ago I talk to Phil at Intentio about some occupied arches for my diorama board. At the time what Phil needed to charge to produce them was more than I could justify for a diorama for taking photos. So I left it at that and I pretty much forgot about it.

Whilst mooching around Telford we happened upon the LCUT Creative stand who had plain infilled arches and a couple of options of occupied versions all for just under £8.00 each. Having asked for measurements and worked out that three arches would create a backdrop for the diorama for just under £25 I decided that I could better justify the outlay.

Now it has to be said that they are made from a very thin fibreboard and can’t in any way be compared to what Phil produces but they will serve the purpose.

I had to use some of the offcuts as packing pieces to allow them to sit back against a piece of plywood that I cut to support them – this is because they come supplied with an internal sections which represents the inside of the parapet but I chose not to use is because I plan to use the spare pieces for something else.

Chris came up with the idea of printing of some old workshop scenes from the internet and sticking them behind the glazing on the windows and this is what it looks like before it get’s any paint on it.

 

LCUT Creative Arches

LCUT Creative Arches

LCUT Creative Arches

LCUT Creative Arches

 

Louvres to you too – JLRT

One of the things that I have tried to do is to make as much use out of each drawing as I can. The NBR and the NER (I haven’t looked too closely at the other constituents of the LNER too closely yet). really help with this because of the many variations on a theme.

Using the example of the 8 ton Jubilee vans that I have just done I managed to use the artwork twice with minor amendments to make the matchboard version. looking a little further in vol 3 of Tatlow brought me to a 3rd and 4th variation this time in the guise of yeast vans same sized bodies, with both beaded and matchboard variations the only difference being is the added complication of louvres.

Since doing the louvres for the NER CCT I have studied and discarded a few methods of making louvres using combinations of styrene strip cut at angles etc. The flush sides of the louvres on the NBR vans gave me the opportunity to try another method which has far exceeded my expectations even if it is a bit time consuming to do.

This is where I have got to with the first van – or rather side of a van. Each side/end is made up of 3 layers and on the two inner layers I have moved the position of the louvre cut outs up by one pixel (I also marked each layer so that I knew which order to assemble them). To cut the slots I used an Exacto type chisel blade which was just marginally too wide for the length of the slot so I rubbed it on a diamond stone to reduce it a little.

To cut out the narrow end I used a suggestion from Graham (Beare) which was at the time for something else but applicable in this instance too. That suggestion was to use a piece of piano wire (0.8mm in this case) and file a chisel blade on one end I then gripped this in a pin vice and away I went – admittedly the patience only let me cut the slots in the 3 layers for one side at one session.

NBR Yeast Van

NBR Yeast Van

IMG_9812
Please excuse the odd second photo I took it this way to illustrate that when viewed from a low angle you can see through the louvres but from the more normal side on view you can – JLRT…….

It still needs some beading finishing off and the other side and the ends need their louvres cutting out

Another Wagon load from Household Waste.

Following on from a posting about wagon loads from household waste, albeit much belatedly, a gent on the guild suggested that the siphon valve wouldn’t really work as a load due to the size of the screw thread. That made sense and at the time I thought that it would make a load that could be sheeted if only I could make a suitable tarpaulin.
Fast forward to Ian G posting a link to an article on making realistic tarps (http://www.militarymodelling.com/news/article/making-realistic-tarps/3310) and I thought that I might have the answer. Sadly several attempts were made none of which were good enough to me. The first using Kleenex tissues just disintegrated and using the process on thin cloth worked but it wasn’t flexible enough. As a last resort I put a few lens cleaning tissues on one side after they were used to dry out and hey presto they worked.
This is what they look like after being ironed and treated – not much different in looks to be honest but they feel slightly thicker and have a texture. More importantly they can be handled/folded/stretched without mishap.
IMG_8620
Next I cut some styrene discs using a leather punch and stuck them to a sheet to make eyelets. When they had dried I drilled holes through them and then brush painted both sides of the sheet black (the original plan was to spray them but I ran out of time last week). Next out came a cheap stencil and the letters LNER were painted on along each edge and some cotton cords tied through each eyelet.
LNER Tarp

LNER Tarp

In between this while things were drying, etc. I made up a timber cradle for the load.
7mm ScaleWagon load from Household waste;

7mm ScaleWagon load from Household waste;

Lastly I tied it all on – I had to add a couple of staples made from 0.45mm wire to the cradle ends to allow the sheet to be fastened.
7mm Scale Sheeted Wagon Load

7mm Scale Sheeted Wagon Load

7mm Scale Sheeted Wagon Load

7mm Scale Sheeted Wagon Load

7mm Scale Sheeted Wagon Load

7mm Scale Sheeted Wagon Load

 

Another Salty Tale

Over the last few weekends in odd moments in between gardening I have put together and painted another Slaters Salt van.
In contrast to the one I built earlier which was depicted as faded and worn I wanted this one to be in a recently out shopped version of the livery so I started by giving the wagon a good coat of paint (as opposed to the deliberately patch finish on the first one).
Slaters 7mm Scale Salt Van

Slaters 7mm Scale Salt Van

Next I pondered on how to get over the fact that the transfers which are homemade and printed on clear decal paper have a tendency for the colour to wash out of the yellow when applied over a green base coat.
Mangers transfer
While it worked brilliantly for the faded livery it doesn’t for a newly painted livery so I thought that I would have a go at over painting the yellow bit of the lettering by hand.
I used Vallejo Sunshine yellow but found that it took a few coats to get it to cover on the slippery surface of the transfers. In all it took six sessions over two weekends to do both sides it’s far from perfect but I am happy with the results and I will use the technique again.
Slaters 7mm Scale PO Salt vans - Mangers

Slaters 7mm Scale PO Salt vans – Mangers

Slaters 7mm Scale PO Salt vans - Mangers

Slaters 7mm Scale PO Salt vans – Mangers

 

Slaters 7mm Scale PO Salt vans - Mangers

Slaters 7mm Scale PO Salt vans – Mangers

Finally a shot of them both together…

Slaters 7mm Scale PO Salt vans - Mangers

Slaters 7mm Scale PO Salt vans – Mangers

Playing about with image stacking

Last night I had a mess about with image stacking – I am quite pleased with the results so far. Each final image is made up from 5 original images combined into one.

Scratch Built NBR 4 Plank Dropside Wagon

Scratch Built NBR 4 Plank Dropside Wagon

Parksdie NBR 4Plank Open

Parksdie NBR 4Plank Open

Parksdie NBR 4Plank Open

Parksdie NBR 4Plank Open

Slaters 7mm PO Salt Wagon

Slaters 7mm PO Salt Wagon

Slaters 7mm PO Salt Wagon

Slaters 7mm PO Salt Wagon

Scratch Built NBR 4 Plank Dropside Wagon

Scratch Built NBR 4 Plank Dropside Wagon

Wagon Loads from Coffee Stirrers Revisited

I have been tinkering around painting some of the wagon loads that I have made from coffee stirrers and thought that I would share them posed in my latest wagon.

Scratch Built NBR 4 Plank Dropside wagon with assorted scratch built timber loads

Scratch Built NBR 4 Plank Dropside wagon with assorted scratch built timber loads

Scratch Built NBR 4 Plank Dropside wagon with assorted scratch built timber loads

Scratch Built NBR 4 Plank Dropside wagon with assorted scratch built timber loads

Scratch Built NBR 4 Plank Dropside wagon with assorted scratch built timber loads

Scratch Built NBR 4 Plank Dropside wagon with assorted scratch built timber loads

Scratch Built NBR 4 Plank Dropside wagon with assorted scratch built timber loads

Scratch Built NBR 4 Plank Dropside wagon with assorted scratch built timber loads

 

More Wagon loads from Coffee Stirrers!

I collected one of these at Leigh show from Paul at EDM Models
[img]http://www.ngtrains.com/Pages/Glues/Images/82439_small.jpg[/img]
Having got it I was keen to give it a try so having picked up an idea for another wagon load while watching the many youtube videos of Pete Waterman’s layout – (just got an infinity upgrade from my puny 1.2mb that I have suffered with for years which makes watching youtube an absolute pleasure!).
So this is what I came up with.

7mm scale Packing case made from Coffee stirrers

7mm scale Packing case made from Coffee stirrers

7mm scale Packing case made from Coffee stirrers

7mm scale Packing case made from Coffee stirrers

The nails are .3mm holes drilled and then touched with a pin point dipped in a dilute solution of Vallejo Charred Brown acrylic.
Regards Rob

Pipes……….

I haven’t managed much time at the workbench recently but this week I managed a little.

Sometime back I posted some home made vacuum pipes and someone asked for a step by step next time I made some.

This is what was included in the kit – the whitemetal ones that is along with the fine beading wire that I use for creating the ‘ribbing’
IMG_6912

I started by measuring and cutting some 50mm lengths of 0.7mm brass rod.

I held each one in a pin vice with 25mm protruding and tucked one end of the beading wire down the small gap in the jaws of the pin vice.

Next I wound the beading wire around the protruding wire keeping the strands tight against each other until I had around 5mm left without binding.
IMG_6914

Holding the end still attached to the reel tight I soldered the beading wire in place then snipped the end attached to the reel.

IMG_6918

Removing it from the pin vice I snipped and tidied the other end up and slipped a 10mm length of annealed microbore tube over the long end. I also drilled a hole in the end of a strip of scrap and soldered it over the other end. Cutting it back and rounding each end once it was soldered in place.

IMG_6920

Being the tight Yorkshireman that I am when I use pinheads for rivets I don’t throw the shanks away. To create the ring around the top end of the tube I annealed a pin shank and wound it around the other end of the bound section on the long section (the end with the microbore tube on it). Finally snipping it off and soldering it in place.

Next I bent the section of annealed tube to right angles and finally I cut a length of shrink tube and shrank it over the top. I have to confess I am not sure about the shrink tube and I may end up cutting it off…..

IMG_6921

The last pair of pipes will be a tad harder because they have taps on them and I need to work out the best way to represent them – Last night I had a brilliant idea on how to do it but I blowed if I can recall it today………

A tip for use with acrylic paint.

I made a start on another wagon last night and made a discovery that I thought worth sharing.

When using enamels I am aware of and have used the technique of using a cotton bud soaked in white spirit to remove unwanted enamel paint – as long as it hasn’t been on too long. I have seen examples of the technique used in weathering.

What I didn’t know or appreciate until last night was that you can do something similar with acrylics by using a cotton bud soaked in meths.

These are a few shots of the wagon that I am now working on that I used the technique on last night.
IMG_6046 IMG_6047 IMG_6049 IMG_6050 IMG_6051

It has quite some way to go but I feel that I have a bit more freedom to experiment knowing that even when it’s gone on quite thick and had some drying time it’s still maneuverable.