How I do return Cranks

For this build the front and rear drivers have the standard 12ba crank pin as provided by Slaters with their wheels. The centre axle has had the 12ba cheese head screw replaced with a 10ba countersunk screw. This is to allow the crank pin bush to be tapped 10ba and an additional bush to be added and again tapped 10ba so that they can be screwed in opposite each other to house both the couple and connecting rods (on this particular kit the extra bush was available because a pair of smaller bushes had been provided for the front axle to ensure clearance for the crossheads).
As well as tapping the crank pin bushes 10ba, I also tap the wheel itself allowing the screw to be tightened and retained.
I must admit for my own builds I tend to replace all my crank pins with 10ba and blacken the wheels but I was told not to for this build.

Use of 10ba crank pins for return cranks

You can see the difference in screw sizes from the back of the wheel.

Use of 10ba crank pins for return cranks

I also drilled and tapped the return crank itself but it will be soldered to the bush once I have cut it to the correct length and made sure that the crank is in the right orientation.

Use of 10ba crank pins for return cranks

Use of 10ba crank pins for return cranks

Making the most of what you have…

My recent lathe purchase has started me thinking about making the most of some of my other tools. I used to do quite a bit of woodworking until we converted our garage and I no longer had the room for many of the woodworking tools so I sold them.
What I kept were, chop saw, Router/router table and a linisher. The Router/router table, until a couple of weeks ago was in my loft so not accessible for regular use and my linisher while slightly more accessible by being under my workbench had only seen the light of day once in the last 5 years.
Prompted by getting something out of the loft I decided to get the┬áRouter/router table and the linisher out and take them to the other house where I have a dry brick built garage that’s alarmed. Fast forward to this weekend and I decided to start making use of them so used the linisher to prepare all the partitions for the twin set. Each one needed to be profiles to fit the vacuum formed Kirk roof and it certainly made a much easier job of the 17 or so partitions plus the coach ends.

Ian Kirk coach partitions

Preparing Ian Kirk coach partitions using a Linishing machine

I reckon what I achieved today would have taken at least a couple of weekend’s work to achieve filing by hand.